Flipping the Classroom

Associate Professor Jamie Peterson and Amelia Ruedy ’16 recently conducted a study at St. Kate’s in one of the upper division Psychology courses, looking at the impact a flipped classroom had on student learning and rapport.

The study used two classes, one a traditional classroom setting where the professor lectured for 20-25 minutes with PowerPoint slides, followed by a brief learning application activity. The other classroom was a flipped classroom. In this setting the professor turned the PowerPoint slides into online lecture videos, and engaged the students in more lengthy learning application activities during class and lab time.The students self-reported their first two exam scores and completed the Professor Student Rapport Scale (Wilson, Ryan, & Pugh, 2010).

This particular study found contrasting results to previous research. The study found that there was no significant difference in student learning and exam scores between the two different classroom settings. There was also no significant difference in student rapport.

The results suggest that using technology to enhance student learning outside of class time does not detract from forming positive relationships between the professor and the students or student learning.

Ruedy enjoyed collaborating side by side with a professor for this research. She plans on entering graduate school within the next year and believes this research has taught her to look at things from a different perspective. “I also enjoy it because it’s really fun and interesting analyzing the results and gaining new knowledge,” Ruedy says. She looks forward to future opportunities for research in graduate school.

 

Lauren M. Crepeau ’16
English, Communication Studies, and Women’s Studies
lmcrepeau@stkate.edu
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Faculty & Student Proposal Accepted by the APA

Dr. Arturo Sesma, assistant professor in the Psychology Department at St. Catherine University, has submitted a proposal regarding non-cognitive skills (NCS) and academic outcomes. Sesma is collaborating with Paige Embertson ’15, Kelsey Olson ’19, and Dr. Jamie Peterson, associate professor. They will be presenting at the American Psychological Association’s National Convention in August.

The proposal attempts “to explain why some students fare poorly in college despite strong high school and college entrance exam, researchers have identified a number of non-cognitive skills (NCS) that may be as important to student academic outcomes as cognitive ability.” The NCS that Sesma et al. are investigating are growth mindset, belongingness, and grit.

Sesma et al. are attempting to: “1) replicate growth-mindset findings on academic outcomes using an intervention design with students from an all women’s university; and 2) examine whether belongingness and grit moderate any putative differences between the control and experimental groups on academic outcomes.”

They are currently collecting data from the 2015-2016 cohort of first-year students at St. Catherine University.

Stay tuned for photos, and the results will be posted here after the convention in August.

 

Lauren M. Crepeau ’16
English, Communication Studies, and Women’s Studies
lmcrepeau@stkate.edu